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sal-paradiso:

Codex Seraphinanus 
sal-paradiso:

Codex Seraphinanus 
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malformalady:

Fertilizer runoff causes toxic algae blooms. This one covered one third of Lake Erie
Photo credit: Peter Essick
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journeythroughthexxthcentury:

Les Folies Bergère - Joséphine Baker, 1936, Illustrator: Gyarmathy Michel
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your-fuckin-mother:

I first saw Cardon Webb’s new cover for The Invisible Man on Pinterest with no info below it, totally didn’t realise it was a contemporary cover! Being a lover of Mid-Century Modern (see my other blog), especially Lustig, Rand and Jazz album covers, I’m obviously going to think these are amazing (and I most definitely do). But personal preference aside they are also very vibrant and eye catching with excellent lettering. As well as having a good reason behind them;
“Ralph Ellison, one of the foremost African American authors of the literary canon, fell in love with music before he focused on writing. That’s why designer Cardon Webb researched record art and type from the mid-century jazz era to create fresh new covers for six of Ellison’s seminal works.”
I’ve been meaning to blog some of Cardon’s work for ages since he launched his new website, but whittling it down proved pretty difficult since I love all his work. Very talented designer, worth looking at his portfolio. Plus his excellent other websites;
http://www.cardonuncovers.com/ for rejected cover designs ( I like these a lot).
http://www.cardoncopy.com/ a project you may have seen before where he takes down hand-done flyers in his neighbourhood and replaces them with his own designs. Which is simultaneously interesting, hilarious and great design as well.
your-fuckin-mother:

I first saw Cardon Webb’s new cover for The Invisible Man on Pinterest with no info below it, totally didn’t realise it was a contemporary cover! Being a lover of Mid-Century Modern (see my other blog), especially Lustig, Rand and Jazz album covers, I’m obviously going to think these are amazing (and I most definitely do). But personal preference aside they are also very vibrant and eye catching with excellent lettering. As well as having a good reason behind them;
“Ralph Ellison, one of the foremost African American authors of the literary canon, fell in love with music before he focused on writing. That’s why designer Cardon Webb researched record art and type from the mid-century jazz era to create fresh new covers for six of Ellison’s seminal works.”
I’ve been meaning to blog some of Cardon’s work for ages since he launched his new website, but whittling it down proved pretty difficult since I love all his work. Very talented designer, worth looking at his portfolio. Plus his excellent other websites;
http://www.cardonuncovers.com/ for rejected cover designs ( I like these a lot).
http://www.cardoncopy.com/ a project you may have seen before where he takes down hand-done flyers in his neighbourhood and replaces them with his own designs. Which is simultaneously interesting, hilarious and great design as well.
your-fuckin-mother:

I first saw Cardon Webb’s new cover for The Invisible Man on Pinterest with no info below it, totally didn’t realise it was a contemporary cover! Being a lover of Mid-Century Modern (see my other blog), especially Lustig, Rand and Jazz album covers, I’m obviously going to think these are amazing (and I most definitely do). But personal preference aside they are also very vibrant and eye catching with excellent lettering. As well as having a good reason behind them;
“Ralph Ellison, one of the foremost African American authors of the literary canon, fell in love with music before he focused on writing. That’s why designer Cardon Webb researched record art and type from the mid-century jazz era to create fresh new covers for six of Ellison’s seminal works.”
I’ve been meaning to blog some of Cardon’s work for ages since he launched his new website, but whittling it down proved pretty difficult since I love all his work. Very talented designer, worth looking at his portfolio. Plus his excellent other websites;
http://www.cardonuncovers.com/ for rejected cover designs ( I like these a lot).
http://www.cardoncopy.com/ a project you may have seen before where he takes down hand-done flyers in his neighbourhood and replaces them with his own designs. Which is simultaneously interesting, hilarious and great design as well.
your-fuckin-mother:

I first saw Cardon Webb’s new cover for The Invisible Man on Pinterest with no info below it, totally didn’t realise it was a contemporary cover! Being a lover of Mid-Century Modern (see my other blog), especially Lustig, Rand and Jazz album covers, I’m obviously going to think these are amazing (and I most definitely do). But personal preference aside they are also very vibrant and eye catching with excellent lettering. As well as having a good reason behind them;
“Ralph Ellison, one of the foremost African American authors of the literary canon, fell in love with music before he focused on writing. That’s why designer Cardon Webb researched record art and type from the mid-century jazz era to create fresh new covers for six of Ellison’s seminal works.”
I’ve been meaning to blog some of Cardon’s work for ages since he launched his new website, but whittling it down proved pretty difficult since I love all his work. Very talented designer, worth looking at his portfolio. Plus his excellent other websites;
http://www.cardonuncovers.com/ for rejected cover designs ( I like these a lot).
http://www.cardoncopy.com/ a project you may have seen before where he takes down hand-done flyers in his neighbourhood and replaces them with his own designs. Which is simultaneously interesting, hilarious and great design as well.
your-fuckin-mother:

I first saw Cardon Webb’s new cover for The Invisible Man on Pinterest with no info below it, totally didn’t realise it was a contemporary cover! Being a lover of Mid-Century Modern (see my other blog), especially Lustig, Rand and Jazz album covers, I’m obviously going to think these are amazing (and I most definitely do). But personal preference aside they are also very vibrant and eye catching with excellent lettering. As well as having a good reason behind them;
“Ralph Ellison, one of the foremost African American authors of the literary canon, fell in love with music before he focused on writing. That’s why designer Cardon Webb researched record art and type from the mid-century jazz era to create fresh new covers for six of Ellison’s seminal works.”
I’ve been meaning to blog some of Cardon’s work for ages since he launched his new website, but whittling it down proved pretty difficult since I love all his work. Very talented designer, worth looking at his portfolio. Plus his excellent other websites;
http://www.cardonuncovers.com/ for rejected cover designs ( I like these a lot).
http://www.cardoncopy.com/ a project you may have seen before where he takes down hand-done flyers in his neighbourhood and replaces them with his own designs. Which is simultaneously interesting, hilarious and great design as well.
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bofransson:

Waldstrasse
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner - circa 1910
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philamuseum:

"The Merry Jesters", 1906, Henri Rousseau
Henri Rousseau was a self-taught painter, famous for depicting jungle scenes despite never leaving France nor seeing a jungle. 
Happy belated birthday, Henri. Cheers to those who never stop dreaming.
 
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killthecurator:

Ellsworth Kelly
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onyxearth:

National Geographic  February  1965
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heracliteanfire:

from Cunrat von Megenberg, “Buch der Natur”, printed by J. Bämler, Augsburg. 1475, 1478, 1481 (via British Museum)
heracliteanfire:

from Cunrat von Megenberg, “Buch der Natur”, printed by J. Bämler, Augsburg. 1475, 1478, 1481 (via British Museum)
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shihlun:

Nobuyoshi Araki, ABCD, 2003.
ABCD is a facsimile of Araki’s four over-sized notebooks lettered thus, which house enlarged contact prints from 94 rolls of film made by him in the early `70s; each is numbered and sequenced in chronological order.
The developer used to develop these negatives was over-heated, causing the emulsion to reticulate and break apart in random fashion. The physical, degenerative effect on the images, lends itself to existential interpretation as if they had survived the blast. The reservoir of images is extracted from everyday life and in essence chronicles Araki’s experience. There is little epiphany in the interpretation of subject matter, shifting from generic urban landscape to sexual acts. The marriage of the mundane and the erotic is at the core of Araki’s canon and here, in 1972, he is laying the conceptual foundation for all future work.
shihlun:

Nobuyoshi Araki, ABCD, 2003.
ABCD is a facsimile of Araki’s four over-sized notebooks lettered thus, which house enlarged contact prints from 94 rolls of film made by him in the early `70s; each is numbered and sequenced in chronological order.
The developer used to develop these negatives was over-heated, causing the emulsion to reticulate and break apart in random fashion. The physical, degenerative effect on the images, lends itself to existential interpretation as if they had survived the blast. The reservoir of images is extracted from everyday life and in essence chronicles Araki’s experience. There is little epiphany in the interpretation of subject matter, shifting from generic urban landscape to sexual acts. The marriage of the mundane and the erotic is at the core of Araki’s canon and here, in 1972, he is laying the conceptual foundation for all future work.
shihlun:

Nobuyoshi Araki, ABCD, 2003.
ABCD is a facsimile of Araki’s four over-sized notebooks lettered thus, which house enlarged contact prints from 94 rolls of film made by him in the early `70s; each is numbered and sequenced in chronological order.
The developer used to develop these negatives was over-heated, causing the emulsion to reticulate and break apart in random fashion. The physical, degenerative effect on the images, lends itself to existential interpretation as if they had survived the blast. The reservoir of images is extracted from everyday life and in essence chronicles Araki’s experience. There is little epiphany in the interpretation of subject matter, shifting from generic urban landscape to sexual acts. The marriage of the mundane and the erotic is at the core of Araki’s canon and here, in 1972, he is laying the conceptual foundation for all future work.
shihlun:

Nobuyoshi Araki, ABCD, 2003.
ABCD is a facsimile of Araki’s four over-sized notebooks lettered thus, which house enlarged contact prints from 94 rolls of film made by him in the early `70s; each is numbered and sequenced in chronological order.
The developer used to develop these negatives was over-heated, causing the emulsion to reticulate and break apart in random fashion. The physical, degenerative effect on the images, lends itself to existential interpretation as if they had survived the blast. The reservoir of images is extracted from everyday life and in essence chronicles Araki’s experience. There is little epiphany in the interpretation of subject matter, shifting from generic urban landscape to sexual acts. The marriage of the mundane and the erotic is at the core of Araki’s canon and here, in 1972, he is laying the conceptual foundation for all future work.
shihlun:

Nobuyoshi Araki, ABCD, 2003.
ABCD is a facsimile of Araki’s four over-sized notebooks lettered thus, which house enlarged contact prints from 94 rolls of film made by him in the early `70s; each is numbered and sequenced in chronological order.
The developer used to develop these negatives was over-heated, causing the emulsion to reticulate and break apart in random fashion. The physical, degenerative effect on the images, lends itself to existential interpretation as if they had survived the blast. The reservoir of images is extracted from everyday life and in essence chronicles Araki’s experience. There is little epiphany in the interpretation of subject matter, shifting from generic urban landscape to sexual acts. The marriage of the mundane and the erotic is at the core of Araki’s canon and here, in 1972, he is laying the conceptual foundation for all future work.
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gurafiku:

Japanese Magazine: Koko Fund for Japan. NNNNY / Taeko Isu. 2012
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rosswolfe:

G. Klutsis, soccer poster for the 1928 Moscow Spartakiad (Bolshevik version of the Olympics). (via http://thecharnelhouse.org/2014/02/09/spartakiade-a-bolshevik-alternative-to-the-olympics/)
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