daily green
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Assaf Benharroch
linkyada:

http://www.assaf-benharroch.com/
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excdus:

Virginia Echeverria
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7yx:

Tudobranco by þelkwon on Flickr.
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Schim Schimmel, Testing the Waters
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Jim Pluk
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sloppy:

between0043, 2010 Oil On Canvas 53.0 x 72.7by, Lee Song
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wearenapoleon:

the happy end of franz kafka’s ‘amerika’ by martin kippenberger, 1994.
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controlimages:

Not now, but soon…
Archive/Prints: ControlImages
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nyctaeus:

John Stezaker
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treebystream:

Victor Vasarely 
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giuliamarzin:

Spoilsport is a path around the social space surrounding contemporary sport, the mechanisms regulating its production of values, its historical background. It is defined as ‘spoilsport’, as it tries to analyze the roots of a passion, determine the measurement conventions of a movement, investigate the causes of success of particular social practices. In English “to spoil” means “to impair the completeness, perfection, or unity of something”; this book defines itself ‘spoilsport’ as it intends to decompose, disunite and compromise the completeness of a phenomenon that requires to be disassembled to be studied in detail.
‘Spoilsport’ is an attitude rather than a research modality. Throughout the thread of featured conversations and contributions, a transdisciplinary field of investigation will be defined, including elements of history, philosophy, art, cinema, performance, music, literature, and accounts of first-hand sport experiences.
Along the path, the reader will encounter different works of art, which aim to trigger doubts and questions about specific aspects of the social space defined by contemporary sport, such as the film Zidane: a 21st Century Portrait (2006) by Douglas Gordon and Philippe Parreno, the video David (2004) by Sam Taylor-Wood, the photographic installation Untitled (Bourgeoisie) by Lyle Ashton Harris (2006), and the performance Rest Energy (1980) by Marina Abramovic and Ulay.
Among the different texts that form the book, four dialogues between Achilles and the Tortoise appear. The two protagonists of Zeno’s paradox were chosen as they are athletes participating in a race that never ends. In the pages that follow, the reader will occasionally encounter them introducing points for reflection, and raising questions and issues around the relationship between art and sport.

With Stefano Baldini, Franco Bitossi, Julia Bryan-Wilson, Nathan Cheriki, Giovanni Giaretta, RoseLee Goldberg, Douglas Gordon, Lyle Ashton Harris, Marine Lahaix, Jørgen Leth, David Rimanelli, Erik Satie, Carolina Valencia Caicedo.
Edited by Riccardo Giacconi.

94 pages
isbn: 978-2-910164-58-4
giuliamarzin:

Spoilsport is a path around the social space surrounding contemporary sport, the mechanisms regulating its production of values, its historical background. It is defined as ‘spoilsport’, as it tries to analyze the roots of a passion, determine the measurement conventions of a movement, investigate the causes of success of particular social practices. In English “to spoil” means “to impair the completeness, perfection, or unity of something”; this book defines itself ‘spoilsport’ as it intends to decompose, disunite and compromise the completeness of a phenomenon that requires to be disassembled to be studied in detail.
‘Spoilsport’ is an attitude rather than a research modality. Throughout the thread of featured conversations and contributions, a transdisciplinary field of investigation will be defined, including elements of history, philosophy, art, cinema, performance, music, literature, and accounts of first-hand sport experiences.
Along the path, the reader will encounter different works of art, which aim to trigger doubts and questions about specific aspects of the social space defined by contemporary sport, such as the film Zidane: a 21st Century Portrait (2006) by Douglas Gordon and Philippe Parreno, the video David (2004) by Sam Taylor-Wood, the photographic installation Untitled (Bourgeoisie) by Lyle Ashton Harris (2006), and the performance Rest Energy (1980) by Marina Abramovic and Ulay.
Among the different texts that form the book, four dialogues between Achilles and the Tortoise appear. The two protagonists of Zeno’s paradox were chosen as they are athletes participating in a race that never ends. In the pages that follow, the reader will occasionally encounter them introducing points for reflection, and raising questions and issues around the relationship between art and sport.

With Stefano Baldini, Franco Bitossi, Julia Bryan-Wilson, Nathan Cheriki, Giovanni Giaretta, RoseLee Goldberg, Douglas Gordon, Lyle Ashton Harris, Marine Lahaix, Jørgen Leth, David Rimanelli, Erik Satie, Carolina Valencia Caicedo.
Edited by Riccardo Giacconi.

94 pages
isbn: 978-2-910164-58-4
giuliamarzin:

Spoilsport is a path around the social space surrounding contemporary sport, the mechanisms regulating its production of values, its historical background. It is defined as ‘spoilsport’, as it tries to analyze the roots of a passion, determine the measurement conventions of a movement, investigate the causes of success of particular social practices. In English “to spoil” means “to impair the completeness, perfection, or unity of something”; this book defines itself ‘spoilsport’ as it intends to decompose, disunite and compromise the completeness of a phenomenon that requires to be disassembled to be studied in detail.
‘Spoilsport’ is an attitude rather than a research modality. Throughout the thread of featured conversations and contributions, a transdisciplinary field of investigation will be defined, including elements of history, philosophy, art, cinema, performance, music, literature, and accounts of first-hand sport experiences.
Along the path, the reader will encounter different works of art, which aim to trigger doubts and questions about specific aspects of the social space defined by contemporary sport, such as the film Zidane: a 21st Century Portrait (2006) by Douglas Gordon and Philippe Parreno, the video David (2004) by Sam Taylor-Wood, the photographic installation Untitled (Bourgeoisie) by Lyle Ashton Harris (2006), and the performance Rest Energy (1980) by Marina Abramovic and Ulay.
Among the different texts that form the book, four dialogues between Achilles and the Tortoise appear. The two protagonists of Zeno’s paradox were chosen as they are athletes participating in a race that never ends. In the pages that follow, the reader will occasionally encounter them introducing points for reflection, and raising questions and issues around the relationship between art and sport.

With Stefano Baldini, Franco Bitossi, Julia Bryan-Wilson, Nathan Cheriki, Giovanni Giaretta, RoseLee Goldberg, Douglas Gordon, Lyle Ashton Harris, Marine Lahaix, Jørgen Leth, David Rimanelli, Erik Satie, Carolina Valencia Caicedo.
Edited by Riccardo Giacconi.

94 pages
isbn: 978-2-910164-58-4
giuliamarzin:

Spoilsport is a path around the social space surrounding contemporary sport, the mechanisms regulating its production of values, its historical background. It is defined as ‘spoilsport’, as it tries to analyze the roots of a passion, determine the measurement conventions of a movement, investigate the causes of success of particular social practices. In English “to spoil” means “to impair the completeness, perfection, or unity of something”; this book defines itself ‘spoilsport’ as it intends to decompose, disunite and compromise the completeness of a phenomenon that requires to be disassembled to be studied in detail.
‘Spoilsport’ is an attitude rather than a research modality. Throughout the thread of featured conversations and contributions, a transdisciplinary field of investigation will be defined, including elements of history, philosophy, art, cinema, performance, music, literature, and accounts of first-hand sport experiences.
Along the path, the reader will encounter different works of art, which aim to trigger doubts and questions about specific aspects of the social space defined by contemporary sport, such as the film Zidane: a 21st Century Portrait (2006) by Douglas Gordon and Philippe Parreno, the video David (2004) by Sam Taylor-Wood, the photographic installation Untitled (Bourgeoisie) by Lyle Ashton Harris (2006), and the performance Rest Energy (1980) by Marina Abramovic and Ulay.
Among the different texts that form the book, four dialogues between Achilles and the Tortoise appear. The two protagonists of Zeno’s paradox were chosen as they are athletes participating in a race that never ends. In the pages that follow, the reader will occasionally encounter them introducing points for reflection, and raising questions and issues around the relationship between art and sport.

With Stefano Baldini, Franco Bitossi, Julia Bryan-Wilson, Nathan Cheriki, Giovanni Giaretta, RoseLee Goldberg, Douglas Gordon, Lyle Ashton Harris, Marine Lahaix, Jørgen Leth, David Rimanelli, Erik Satie, Carolina Valencia Caicedo.
Edited by Riccardo Giacconi.

94 pages
isbn: 978-2-910164-58-4
giuliamarzin:

Spoilsport is a path around the social space surrounding contemporary sport, the mechanisms regulating its production of values, its historical background. It is defined as ‘spoilsport’, as it tries to analyze the roots of a passion, determine the measurement conventions of a movement, investigate the causes of success of particular social practices. In English “to spoil” means “to impair the completeness, perfection, or unity of something”; this book defines itself ‘spoilsport’ as it intends to decompose, disunite and compromise the completeness of a phenomenon that requires to be disassembled to be studied in detail.
‘Spoilsport’ is an attitude rather than a research modality. Throughout the thread of featured conversations and contributions, a transdisciplinary field of investigation will be defined, including elements of history, philosophy, art, cinema, performance, music, literature, and accounts of first-hand sport experiences.
Along the path, the reader will encounter different works of art, which aim to trigger doubts and questions about specific aspects of the social space defined by contemporary sport, such as the film Zidane: a 21st Century Portrait (2006) by Douglas Gordon and Philippe Parreno, the video David (2004) by Sam Taylor-Wood, the photographic installation Untitled (Bourgeoisie) by Lyle Ashton Harris (2006), and the performance Rest Energy (1980) by Marina Abramovic and Ulay.
Among the different texts that form the book, four dialogues between Achilles and the Tortoise appear. The two protagonists of Zeno’s paradox were chosen as they are athletes participating in a race that never ends. In the pages that follow, the reader will occasionally encounter them introducing points for reflection, and raising questions and issues around the relationship between art and sport.

With Stefano Baldini, Franco Bitossi, Julia Bryan-Wilson, Nathan Cheriki, Giovanni Giaretta, RoseLee Goldberg, Douglas Gordon, Lyle Ashton Harris, Marine Lahaix, Jørgen Leth, David Rimanelli, Erik Satie, Carolina Valencia Caicedo.
Edited by Riccardo Giacconi.

94 pages
isbn: 978-2-910164-58-4
+
giuliamarzin:

Spoilsport is a path around the social space surrounding contemporary sport, the mechanisms regulating its production of values, its historical background. It is defined as ‘spoilsport’, as it tries to analyze the roots of a passion, determine the measurement conventions of a movement, investigate the causes of success of particular social practices. In English “to spoil” means “to impair the completeness, perfection, or unity of something”; this book defines itself ‘spoilsport’ as it intends to decompose, disunite and compromise the completeness of a phenomenon that requires to be disassembled to be studied in detail.
‘Spoilsport’ is an attitude rather than a research modality. Throughout the thread of featured conversations and contributions, a transdisciplinary field of investigation will be defined, including elements of history, philosophy, art, cinema, performance, music, literature, and accounts of first-hand sport experiences.
Along the path, the reader will encounter different works of art, which aim to trigger doubts and questions about specific aspects of the social space defined by contemporary sport, such as the film Zidane: a 21st Century Portrait (2006) by Douglas Gordon and Philippe Parreno, the video David (2004) by Sam Taylor-Wood, the photographic installation Untitled (Bourgeoisie) by Lyle Ashton Harris (2006), and the performance Rest Energy (1980) by Marina Abramovic and Ulay.
Among the different texts that form the book, four dialogues between Achilles and the Tortoise appear. The two protagonists of Zeno’s paradox were chosen as they are athletes participating in a race that never ends. In the pages that follow, the reader will occasionally encounter them introducing points for reflection, and raising questions and issues around the relationship between art and sport.

With Stefano Baldini, Franco Bitossi, Julia Bryan-Wilson, Nathan Cheriki, Giovanni Giaretta, RoseLee Goldberg, Douglas Gordon, Lyle Ashton Harris, Marine Lahaix, Jørgen Leth, David Rimanelli, Erik Satie, Carolina Valencia Caicedo.
Edited by Riccardo Giacconi.

94 pages
isbn: 978-2-910164-58-4